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Reducing Harm: Could Knowing Your Pot be The Key to Treating...

The United States has been experiencing a surge in opioid addiction for over two decades, and the emergence of other drugs has also fallen into that mix. Today, these addictions have entered crisis mode. Our nation is truly suffering from an epidemic. Cocaine and opioid based drugs are just two of the most difficult addictions to overcome because of the way they alter the brain. Though traditional abstinence has usually been the method used for treating drug addiction, this does not seem to have a great track record since abstinence is rarely achievable for many addicts and eventually leads to relapses, says Dr. Nora...

Digital Hate: What Families and Communities Should be Talking About

There are many forms of digital hate, ranging from online bullying to attacks carried out by hate, extremist or terrorist groups. Recently there has been a tremendous surge in these group's destructive agendas and they are affecting our society as they emerge from the online shadows. As the threat of digital hate continues to grow no one is immune to its undue influence, said Rick Eaton, the Senior Researcher for the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Digital Terrorism & Hate Project, during a digital hate presentation for the Columbus Police Academy on October 6, 2017. Not many people surf the web strategically looking for an opportunity to be...

Federal Rules of Evidence: Additions to Rule 902 Will Shift Gears...

Modern technology has allowed our generation to thrive in a digital world. Countless people, businesses, trade markets and various influential institutions are driven by technology while using its global presence to compete and succeed. Social media has also become a platform for news reporting, advertising and simply staying connected with the world. However, cybercrime remains a silent threat to all, but prosecuting it proves challenging despite attempts at collaboration among all law agencies, because of legal restrictions on forensic evidence handling, authenticity and admissibility (Carter, 2007; Feulner, 2017; Liston, 2016; Rosichan, 2017). Not too long ago, the struggle to morph digital evidence into real evidence...

Wrongfully Prescribed Medicare Recipients

Nearly half a million people in the United States have been prescribed too many opioid drugs. Individuals that were on Medicare’s drug plan received shockingly large amounts. Of those prescribed, individuals consumed dangerously powerful dosages of opioid drugs. In this past year, 22,000 people had admitted to “doctor shipping” for drugs. Like overprescribing, it put both groups “‘at serious risk of opioid misuse or overdose,’ a government watchdog reported Thursday” (Bernstein, 2017, n.p.). According to the Inspector General’s office of the U.S. Health and Human Services Department, people took drug amounts considered too large under the standards set by the Center for Disease Control and...

U.S. Postal worker delivered drugs

A United States postal worker from Boca Raton, Fla., admitted to accepting cash in exchange for delivering packages of drugs along her daily route. Evelyn Ramona Price, 53-years-old, pleaded guilty to “bribery of a public official” (Hitchcock, 2017, n.p.) in federal court. She told federal authorities that she had been taking cash bribes to deliver drug packages for months. Her charge, “carries a maximum sentence of 15 years in federal prison and a fine of $250,000” (Hitchcock, 2017, n.p.). Federal authorities allegedly questioned Price late last year after one of her deliveries. The package she handled was suspicious. Price delivered it to a woman who did not live at...

Grand Rapids’ Grand Plan for Police and Community Relations

How do community members discuss big issues like policing? Grand Rapids, MI is beginning a “police and community relations” program that will include a series of community listening sessions to increase engagement of all citizens in this issue. The community outreach plan includes listening sessions which will be used to decide how the city will utilize $1 million per year to enrich the relationship between community members and the police in Grand Rapids. Described on the city’s website as an “ongoing, robust and authentic community outreach plan,” it will be led by a commission and will focus on recommendations made by the Safe Alliances for Everyone...

Community Reopens Police Department After Eight Year Closure

In 2008, there were just over 1 million police officers in the U.S. That number has diminished by 7% since the Great Recession as sharply decreased revenues have forced towns all over the U.S. to make very difficult decisions about budget cuts, layoffs, and even closures of police departments (Schoen, 2013, paragraph 5). Despite the economic struggle, one Ohio town hopes to refocus its energy on public safety. “ didn’t like the idea when left” (Armon, 2017, paragraph 25), says Amin Abraham, a resident and business owner in Lakemore, OH, a town that has recently reopened its police department after almost eight years. The department...

Police Caught Doing Good

News surrounding the United States police force has not always been positive; this is especially true in recent months. Media appears to only portray officers who have killed or been killed. These are the stories that the press love to jump on. Many times, they are the only things we hear about the police. While the latter cannot be ignored, there are so many underrepresented officers on the force serving, protecting, and going the extra mile for their communities. It is important that as citizens we do not lose sight of all the good these men and women do for us. A Plus, a digital media company...

The Stigmatization of Mentally Ill Prisoners and Why We Need Criminal...

Severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, affects approximately four percent of the general U.S. population. That figure jumps to approximately 15 percent when examining individuals in jails across the nation. In comparison to inmates who don’t have a serious mental illness, those who do tend to stay in jail longer. This is attributed to their higher rates of exposure to the physical and emotional traumas of incarceration, which then often leads to violence and self-harm. While incarcerated, prisoners have a constitutional right to adequate health care. This includes treatment for mental health; yet jails are so overwhelmed by the growth of inmate...